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WATCH: Florida fishermen come within feet of 14-foot white shark

A day on the water in Amelia Island, Florida, turned into a once-in-a-lifetime experience for a group of fishermen.

>> Click here to watch the news report

Capt. Tony Peeples with Southern Style Charters said he and a group of four men were off the coast of Fernandina Beach north of the jetties when they came within feet of a 14-foot white shark.

Peeples said he was leaning over the side of the boat with his hands in the water when one man said, "I got a shark."

“I just got through bending over on that side of the boat releasing a fish,” Peeples said. “I kind of stood up and looked and said, ‘No it ain’t … Yeah it is.’”

Peeples said the shark came out from under the boat and ate half of a 50-pound drum – in one bite.

>> Read more trending news 

He said the shark got hooked after it went around the back of the boat and ate the other half of the drum.

“The guy that had him on the rod ... the look on his face when he seen a great white shark, it was just like awe,” Peeples said. “His eyes were all lit up.”

Chris Fischer with OCEARCH told WJAX that white sharks commonly spend the winter months off the Florida coast and move north in April or May.

Hilton, a 12 1/2-foot white shark tagged by OCEARCH, pinged off the coast of Ponte Vedra Beach on Thursday.

Fischer said the sharks are good for the ocean because they strengthen fish populations by eating weak or dying fish.

“Seeing a great white shark is a once-in-a-lifetime (event) for most,” Peebles said, adding that in his 30 years as a charter boat captain, he’s never seen a white shark so big.

“It’s kind of a humbling experience when you look down and see something that big three feet from you,” he said. 

Allergic reaction to granola bar kills 12-year-old girl, family says

A Georgia family is in mourning after an allergic reaction to peanuts led to the death of a 12-year-old girl.

>> Watch the news report here

Amanda Huynh had been hospitalized before for allergic reactions to peanuts, but it's still surreal for her brother that she's gone.

"She meant a lot, to me, and i feel like she means a lot to the community," said her brother, Dillon Huynh.

The honor roll student at Lee Middle School in Coweta County was on her way home Tuesday on a school bus when she took a bite of a granola bar.

It was a snack that her family says she had eaten before.

"She would always check everything and make sure it was right," Dillon said.

>> Read more trending news 

But she started to feel sick and school officials were able to call 911 for an ambulance to take her to the hospital.

Her brother shared pictures from her hospital bed where doctors told the family even if she woke up she would have permanent brain damage.

Amanda died Thursday, and her family held her funeral on Sunday.

The principal at Lee Middle School sent a letter to parents about how grief counselors will be at the school in the coming days.

Amanda's brother said he hopes her story will educate others about food allergies.

"(I want people to) live with her in their hearts and really know how serious this is," he said.

>> See a GoFundMe page for the family here

Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

If you are recovering from cardiac arrest, doctors are essential to the healing process, right? According to a new report, you’re more likely to survive if your cardiologist is away.

>> On You may be able to better avoid heart attacks with this common snack, study says

Researchers from Harvard University recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, to determine the possibility of survival for people who suffer heart attacks when their doctors are away.

To do so, they examined the 30-day survival rate of Medicare heart attack sufferers admitted to the hospital while their doctors were at the five-day Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics meeting.

>> Read more trending news 

After analyzing the results, they found that 19.5 percent of patients died within 30 days of admission when the doctor was present. It was just 16.9 percent when the cardiologist was away.

Some heart attack sufferers require stents, which are tubes inserted into the heart blood vessels to help clear passageways. About 15.3 percent of heart attack patients, who needed stents and were admitted on meeting days, died within 30 days. About 16.7 percent admitted on non-meeting dates died within the month.

>> On You can avoid strokes and heart attacks with these two household fruits, study says

“Which doctor treats you does matter. The types of doctors who attend these meetings seem to provide different care, at least for a subgroup of patients,” coauthor Aunupam Jena said in a statement. “This is an unfortunate paradox given that professional conferences are designed to actually makes us better physicians and improve the care we deliver.”

The scientists said doctors who attend the conferences perform more stents. They’re also more focused on publishing research and more likely to run clinical trials, compared to their peers who do not go to the meetings.

“If doctors focus their attention on a particular kind of procedure, they might not develop other clinical skills that are as important to influencing outcomes as is knowledge of a specific procedure,” Jena said. “Treating a cardiac patient isn't just about cardiac issues—it's about other factors that the patient brings to the hospital.”

Although the researchers have drawn conclusions about cardiac specialists who attend conferences and those who don’t, they said the true differences are still unknown.

That’s why they hope to continue their investigations to explore how a variety of physicians develop their nonprocedural skills over time.

>> On Got heart disease? You may have a better chance of survival if married

“The fact that mortality actually falls for heart attack patients during these conference dates raises important questions about how care might differ during these periods,” Jena said. “What we really want to know is how we can close the gap in outcomes and save more lives.”

Scott Baio's wife, Renee, says she has microvascular brain disease

Actor Scott Baio's wife, Renee, has microvascular brain disease, she tweeted Saturday.

>> Scott Baio denies sexual misconduct allegation by 'Charles in Charge' co-star Nicole Eggert

"Besides having 2 meningioma brain tumors, in Oct 2017 I also learned I have Microvascular Brain Disease," the former stuntwoman wrote in response to a question from a fan.

>> See the tweet here

Scott Baio added: "Unfortunately, this is true. Renee is forever my rock, my life & my soulmate! Toughest person I know."

>> See his tweet here

>> Read more trending news 

The condition refers to "changes to the small blood vessels in the brain" and, "if left untreated, it can contribute to mental decline, strokes, walking and balance problems, and dementia," HealthLine reports.

Read more here.

Jason Aldean's wife, Brittany, blasts 'parent shamers' after taking vacation without baby

Jason Aldean’s wife, Brittany, has had enough of keyboard critics.

While on an adults-only vacation with friends Dee Jay Silver and his wife, Jenna Perdue, some social media users slammed the Aldeans for leaving behind their 3-month-old baby boy, Memphis.

>> Read more trending news 

Brittany Aldean put her foot down in an Instagram post last week.

Sharing a photo of herself with her husband, she wrote: “Much needed vacay. Just a word of wisdom for all the parent shamers ... vacations are ok for new parents to take. Sometimes after being pregnant for almost a year, cooped up in a house for weeks at a time, you need a little sunshine and adult time. IT IS NOT OK to leave your ignorant comments. If you don’t agree with something, PLEASE ... do me a favor and unfollow me. You will NOT be missed. And for all the sweet, positive, happy people ... we love you and thank you!!"

>> See the post here

Read more here.

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

What is a shamrock and what does it have to do with St. Patrick's Day?

The shamrock is the most iconic symbol of St. Patrick’s Day, but what do you really know about the three-leafed plant you’ll probably see adorned on all things green on March 17?

>> St. Patrick's Day 2017: How did it get started; why corned beef and cabbage; who is Patrick?

What is the shamrock?

Merriam-Webster defines a shamrock as “a small plant with three leaves on each stem that is the national symbol of Ireland”—not to be confused with the lucky four-leaf clover.

The yellow-flowered Old World clover, according to the dictionary, is often regarded as the “true” shamrock.

History of the shamrock

Its history dates back to ancient Ireland when the shamrock, also called the “seamroy” by the Celts, represented the rebirth of spring.

During the 1798 Irish Rebellion when the English began to conquer Irish land and make laws against their language and practice of Catholicism, wearing the shamrock became a symbol of Irish nationalism, according to

But contrary to popular belief, Ireland’s national symbol isn’t the shamrock. It’s actually the harp, which you’ll find on Irish coins, state seals and the presidential flag.

And while green is the color most associated with Ireland today—arguably due to both the shamrock and Ireland’s lush nature—the national color of origin was actually a shade of blue used by the Order of St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland.

Why is the shamrock linked to St. Patrick’s Day?

According to St. Patrick's Day lore, St. Patrick used the leaves of a shamrock as a metaphor for the holy trinity. Each leaf represented either the Father, the Son or the Holy Spirit.

Many representations of St. Patrick depict the patron saint with shamrocks tied to his robes, the Sun reported.

Others show him in pictures alongside shamrocks.

According to academic folklorist Jack Santino, some pictures of St. Patrick even present him driving the snakes out of Ireland—a popular, debunked legend associated with the Christian figure—with a cross in one hand and a spring of shamrocks in the other.

Learn more about the holiday, its symbols, history and legends.

Parents paint uplifting messages on bathroom stalls at Texas elementary school

Looking to brighten their kids’ days, a group of parents at Mary Moore Elementary School in Arlington got together and painted uplifting messages in the school’s bathrooms, KENS5 reports

>> Read more trending news 

Colorful flowers and motivational sayings now decorate the bathroom stalls, saying things like “Your mistakes don’t define you” and “Every day is a chance to be better.” 

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

The school posted pictures of the parents’ work to Facebook

The Facebook post has since been shared nearly 158,000 times and garnered nearly 6,000 comments. 

Dogs love donated chairs at shelter

The dogs awaiting adoption at one Illinois animal shelter no longer have to sleep on a cold floor.

>> Read more trending news 

The Knox County Humane Society posted a Facebook video Monday of their adoptable dogs lounging comfortably in donated chairs. Goober, Mickey, Tango and Buster Brown are seen making themselves at home on the chairs until they find their forever home.


The Knox County Humane Society wrote on Facebook, "The shelter pets absolutely love their chairs! If anyone has any older chairs they no longer want, please think of the shelter pets!"

Man disciplines son by making him run to school in rain

After his son was kicked off the school bus for three days for bullying, a father in Virginia came up with an alternative way for him to get to school.

>> Read more trending news 

As punishment, Bryan Thornhill made his son run to school. In a Facebook video posted on Thursday, Thornhill streams his son running with his backpack on in the rain, with Thornhill riding in a car behind him. In the Facebook video, Thornhill explained why he chose this form of punishment and gave "tough love" parenting advice to others. (Note: The video contains language that some may find objectionable.)

The video has generated millions of views and has sparked a mix of praise and criticism.

Thornhill said in the video that his son's behavior has improved since the punishment.

Merriam-Webster adds 850 new words to dictionary, including 'dumpster fire'

Merriam-Webster announced this week the addition of 850 words to its online dictionary. 

>> Read more trending news 

In a news release about the dictionary update, Merriam-Webster said the new terms come from a "cross-section of our linguistic culture." The new words include "chiweenie," "cryptocurrency," "mansplain" and "dumpster fire."

Foodies will enjoy the additions of words related to international cuisine, including "harissa," a spicy North African paste and "kabocha," a Japanese winter squash.

In a nod to text messaging and other forms of electronic speech, Merriam-Webster is including word approximations such as "hmm," "ooh" and "welp." 

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