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WATCH: Teen recreates ‘Mulan’ training montage shot-for-shot for homework, project goes viral

A teen in Hawaii is going viral thanks to her take on a school project.

Glenna Matauto was tasked to recreate a scene from her family movie for her broadcast media class, Hawaii News Now reported.

>> Read more trending news 

So she and some friends took on the segment “Be a Man” from Disney’s “Mulan” and recreated the training montage from the 1998 animated feature.

Matauto said in her Twitter post that filming the clip took “three days, five broken sticks and a shoe and volleyball stuck in a tree” for them to put together their 38-second video.

The video in the six days after posting had more than 8.6 million views and 581,000 likes.

Hawaii News Now said that Matauto hasn’t received her grade yet for the project but some on social media think she deserves an Oscar.

She also has plans on making another video and is taking requests on her Twitter account.

Student held in Alabama school shooting that killed 17-year-old girl

A 17-year-old student has been taken into custody in connection with a Wednesday afternoon shooting at an Alabama high school that left one girl dead. 

Birmingham police officials have not named the student, but they issued a statement Thursday morning that gave scant information on the investigation into the shooting at Huffman High School that left Courtlin La’shawn Arrington, also 17, dead. 

“Detectives of the Birmingham Police Department have been working through the night reviewing evidence, video and statements on the tragic incident that took place at Huffman High School yesterday,” read the statement, obtained by “Due to their diligent work, a person of interest has been taken into custody.”

The shooting took place around 3:45 p.m., during afternoon dismissal. Arrington, who reported received CPR at the scene, was taken to UAB Hospital, where she was pronounced dead about 30 minutes later. 

Charges are pending a review by the Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office, the statement read. Because no charges have been filed, the department will not release information on the person in custody. reported that, although police officials initially reported that the shooting appeared to be accidental, that classification came into question when it was discovered that the shooting was caught on video.

The video led investigators to pursue charges against the student, a boy who suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the leg in the incident, said. He was treated and released from an emergency room before being taken in for questioning. 

Arrington, who was due to graduate in two months, planned to study nursing. Her Facebook page includes an introduction that reads, “SEN18R. Dream come true, gotta chase it. Future RN.”

Her last photo that she posted of herself appeared to be taken in the hallway of the school. It was posted the day before she was killed. 

Her photos also include images of her wearing scrubs. 

During a news conference held inside the school Wednesday night, Birmingham Mayor Randall Woodfin spoke of the grief of losing a girl with a bright future. 

“I know that there’s an active investigation going on, but I just want to remind all of us we lost a person today, and not just a person, a student,” Woodfin said. “But I’m quickly reminded this is not just a student, this is someone’s daughter. Someone’s niece. Someone’s best friend. Someone’s granddaughter we lost. 

“This is a 17-year-old who, 30 days from now, would be 18. A graduating senior who had been accepted into college already, who had aspirations and dreams to be a nurse. So, we’re not just talking about some person. We’re talking about losing a part of our future. And our hearts are heavy.”

Birmingham police Chief Orlando Wilson offered condolences to the families of both teens, who at the time of the news conference were both classified as victims. 

“We have an ongoing investigation. With that investigation, we are going to sort out the information as it comes,” Wilson said. “Wherever (that information) takes us, then we’ll act accordingly. Right now, we have a lot of unanswered questions.”

Wilson choked up when asked about the task of telling a parent that their child was killed at school, where students are supposed to be safe. 

“The best I can say is that’s a hard one, and we had to do it,” Wilson said after pausing to collect his thoughts. “It has been done. That parent now knows what happened to their child.”

He paused again before shaking his head.

“I don’t know how you tell a parent,” Wilson said. 

Birmingham City Schools Superintendent Lisa Herring spoke about losing two of the city’s students, Arrington to her wounds and the other teen to the consequences of the shooting. 

“Our goal is to reassure our parents that, as much as we can, we’ll work to keep our schools safe,” Herring said. “But our hearts and our minds are on the families tonight.”

Herring questioned how school district officials can reassure parents, faculty and students that a school is safe following a shooting inside its walls, but said she and her staff would work to do so every day, including heightening security at Huffman and the city’s other 40-plus public schools. 

She also praised the response of Huffman’s administrators, faculty and staff. 

“Our principal and the staff here at Huffman High School, for as much as they have been able to tackle a very difficult day, have done an exceptional job of trying to provide care and concern for those who were in the building and those who exited out,” Herring said.  

>> Read more trending news

Though Herring initially said that the school would be open Thursday, and that a crisis team would be on hand to help students and staff through the day, district officials announced just before midnight that the school would be closed instead. 

“The magnitude of this event causes us to pause. I have decided to close Huffman High School tomorrow for students and staff,” Herring said in a statement. “This delay will provide us an opportunity to provide a thorough safety sweep of the school. This will also allow us to coordinate with organizations in the community to provide counseling support to both students and staff. 

“During this time, we will continue to collaborate with the chief of police and the Birmingham Police Department to implement additional safety precautions and provide additional police presence at the school when students return. We want to assure our parents, students, staff and community that safety and security are a top priority for Birmingham City Schools.”

Woodfin also ordered the flags at city facilities be flown at half-staff in mourning. 

The mayor said during Wednesday night’s news conference that it is important the public mourn with Arrington’s family and wrap its collective arms around the Huffman High School community. 

“The Birmingham City Schools system and our entire Birmingham community is in mourning and grief right now,” Woodfin said. 

Tennessee mom records cars illegally passing her kids' school bus 

A Tennessee woman is angry that cars are illegally passing her children’s school bus, and she has posted several videos on Facebook and has reached out to authorities in Knox County, WBIR reported.

>> Read more trending news

“People aren't paying attention when the stop signs have been out,” Ellie Whitesell of Knoxville told WBIR. “My child could get killed.”

Whitesell’s children attend West Valley Middle School in Knoxville. She said cars are illegally passing their school bus almost every day.

The sheriff's office released a statement saying that when it receives a complaint, “we will do what we can to alleviate the problem.”

“The best way to prevent people from passing stopped buses with stop signs out is through education,” the sheriff’s statement read. “Drivers should always be aware of their surroundings and stay off the phone.”

JLL Transport operates the bus that stops at Whitesell’s neighborhood, WBIR reported. Company owner John Llewellyn said people break the law every day.

“It’s a big enough issue that with 330 buses that run every day, there's about 10 to 15 I hear on my dispatch every day,” he told WBIR.

Here is a video from December 2017:

Mom calls school assignment racist

The mother of a 5th grader at Meadowdale Elementary School feels her son’s homework assignment was racist

Shawna Gallagher’s 11-year-old son, Blaine, was asked to write a journal entry for his social studies class explaining what it would be like to watch Native Americans slaughter colonists.

>> Read more trending news 

The assignment lays out a violent scenario. In part it explains, “several dozen colonists – men, women, and children – were slaughtered with their own guns. Many of these colonists were killed at their dinner table as they shared their meal with their ‘friends.’” 

The lesson asks the students to answer questions in the perspective of a colonist. The questions include, “Express your conflicting feelings toward the Indians.”

Blaine Gallagher is the only Native American in his class and a member of the Klamath Tribe. His mom couldn't believe her son was asked to describe what it was like to “slaughter” colonists.

“I have never seen where they ask a student who is of Native descent to write in first person as a colonist,” Gallagher said. “That was beyond unacceptable to me.”

“It was upsetting,” Blaine said. “I didn’t want to read it because it told me about slaughtering by my own people.”

The lesson was not a part of the Meadowdale Elementary social studies curriculum. Teachers can supplement the lesson plan with their own assignments, the Edmonds School District said. This homework assignment was created in 1971, which Gallagher said is clearly outdated. 

“When I asked who approved the supplemental material, they said no one,” she said.

Edmonds School District spokesperson Debbie Joyce Jakala says administrators will consider what happened to prevent the “rare” incident from happening again in the future. 

“We are embracing that it was inappropriate and want to take steps to correct that,” Jakala said. “This hopefully will not reflect on what we have been striving and working toward as a school district.”

However, Gallagher said her son’s teacher had a different response. 

“The teacher let me know she was offended by me bringing up my concerns,” she said. 

The Edmonds School District said cultural sensitivity is a top priority for staff. Jakala said supplemental lessons will be monitored closely in the future. 

Parents paint uplifting messages on bathroom stalls at Texas elementary school

Looking to brighten their kids’ days, a group of parents at Mary Moore Elementary School in Arlington got together and painted uplifting messages in the school’s bathrooms, KENS5 reports

>> Read more trending news 

Colorful flowers and motivational sayings now decorate the bathroom stalls, saying things like “Your mistakes don’t define you” and “Every day is a chance to be better.” 

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

The school posted pictures of the parents’ work to Facebook

The Facebook post has since been shared nearly 158,000 times and garnered nearly 6,000 comments. 

High school basketball coach criticized after team wins playoff game 93-7

A Massachusetts high school basketball coach is coming under fire after his basketball team beat student athletes from another school by 86 points.

>> Watch the news report here

The Division III South Sectional playoff game took place Wednesday between the East Bridgewater Lady Vikings and Madison Park Vocational High School Cardinals.

>> Read more trending news 

In the end, East Bridgewater won the game 93-7, something some parents say is an example of poor sportsmanship.

“I wouldn’t want to drive it so far into the dirt when you’re really rubbing it in their face. It’s one thing to beat a team; it’s another to really drag them through the mud. That’s just bad sportsmanship,” John Healey said.

Superintendent Liz Legault agreed and issued an apology.

"This was an unfortunate situation and shouldn’t be a reflection of our girls or the East Bridgewater Athletic Program. Both teams were excited for the first round of the playoffs and unfortunately they were not matched up well,” she said in a statement to WFXT.

But others say the criticism belongs with the superintendent – and that an apology isn’t necessary.

“The score is the score,” Joe Schwede said. “Not everyone is going to get a trophy; they’ve got to stop that. There’s going to be a winner and there’s going to be a loser.”

Parents told us there were only eight East Bridgewater girls dressed for the game, so some starters did play through the second half.

“We now have time to reflect, discuss, learn and move forward in the best interest of our girls and program,” Legault said.

The MIAA regulates high school sports in Massachusetts and told WFXT that the East Bridgewater team did not violate any rules in the victory.

Police union won't defend Parkland, Florida, school resource officer if he faces legal action

When a shooter opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, last month, sheriff’s deputy Scot Peterson, who was on duty as the school’s resource officer, reportedly failed to enter the building as 17 people died — but that’s not why the police union won’t be defending him.

According to Jeff Bell, president of the Broward County Sheriff’s Deputies Association, the union will not be stepping up to help Peterson, not due to his conduct but because he doesn’t pay the union any money, reported.

>> Walmart raising age to buy guns to 21 after Florida high school shooting

“From a legal standpoint, we say he was not a ‘dues-paying member,” Bell said, according to “If he was a dues-paying member, I would certainly have a problem with how we are trying him in the public and not giving him his due process. But because he’s not a dues-paying member and I don’t have to represent him? Whatever happens, happens.”

>> PHOTOS: Remembering Parkland Florida school shooting victims

Under Florida’s public sector union laws, Peterson is not required to financially support Bell’s union, but he’s also not legally free to associate with a different bargaining unit instead. While the law enforcement veteran of 32 years is still covered by collective bargaining agreements signed by Broward County Sheriff’s Deputies Association, the union didn’t act on his behalf when he indicated prior to his resignation that was upset that his employer suspended him following the tragedy — and they won’t be coming to his rescue should he face any legal repercussions for his inaction at the high school.

>> Florida school shooting: How difficult is it to purchase a gun in Florida?

Peterson may be eligible to collect a pension of at least $52,000 and is supposed to have half of his health insurance premiums covered the Broward County Sheriff’s Office for life. Although he claims he thought the shooting was taking place outside the school, his failure to enter the building and confront the shooter could still lead to his facing an investigation and ending up in civil court. Either way, the Broward County Sheriff’s Deputies Association won’t be involved.

>> Read more trending news 

“If the sheriff’s office decides not to, say for example, they decide you know what, we’re not going to give you your payouts and we’re not going to give you your insurance or whatever, I’m still not doing anything for him,” Bell said. “So, he doesn’t have the right to file a grievance–well, he can do it as an individual, but when he gets to the level of arbitration, we’re not covering that. If he has any lawsuits, we’re not covering that. Administrative hearings or civil hearings, we’re not covering that.”

Only “dues-paying members” get that level of protection, he added.

Police arrest NC bus driver, say she threatened to shoot up middle school 

A North Carolina school bus driver was arrested for posting threatening social media posts targeted toward Porter Ridge Middle School in Union County and its staff members, police said.

>> Read more trending news

Deputies said Lashaunda Hooker Beachum, 32, is facing two felony charges for making false reports concerning mass violence on educational property.

She mentioned several members of the school staff by name as well as “immigrants” living in suburban estates, officials said.

Deputies said the initial post appeared under a fake name on a local Facebook page, “What’s Up Indian Trail,” around 2 a.m. Friday, but was posted again a few hours later.

Beachum was reported to the Union County Public Schools and Union County Sheriff’s Office, which investigated.

Joshua Gregory said both of his children had interactions with Beachum, and after reading her threatening post, he said he is relieved she is no longer behind the wheel.

"Not knowing when you'll see them again or that they'll be OK is very scary," he said.

Gregory said his son goes to Porter Ridge Middle School. Friday, he made his son stay home, fearing threats made on social media would be carried out.

"The bottom drops when you hear stuff like that,” Gregory said.

Gregory was surprised to find out the person behind the threats was his son's school bus driver.

>> Teacher who reportedly hosted white nationalist podcast under investigation

"It just blew our mind,” he said. “What if my kids were on the bus and she got angry?"

School officials said that Beachum started working with Union County Public Schools on Jan. 3. She was fired Friday.

“It just goes to show you what lengths people are willing to go to when they have evil in their heart,” Gregory said.

Porter Ridge had additional security on campus Friday.

"I pray every day that when my children leave me that God's going to take care of them,” Gregory said.

The motive behind the two messages allegedly posted by Beachum is not clear, but detectives said they don’t believe Beachum intended on acting on the threat.

“The safety of our kids and schools is one of our highest priorities,” Union County Sheriff Eddie Cathey said in a news release. “Any comment, rumor or social media post mentioning violence on school property is unacceptable and will not be tolerated.”

Florida teacher accused of hosting white nationalist podcast claims it was ‘political satire’

A Florida school district removed a middle school teacher who reportedly hosted a white nationalist podcast, the Tampa Bay Times reported Monday. The teacher, meanwhile, said through her attorney that she "employed political satire and exaggeration,” and that there was “no truth” to the views expressed.

>> Read more trending news

The Citrus County School District announced Sunday that Dayanna Volitich, 25, a social studies teacher at Crystal River Middle School, has been removed from the classroom while it conducts an investigation.

The investigation comes after a Huffington Post report Saturday that alleged Volitich hosted a podcast called “Unapologetic” under the alias of “Tiana Dalichov.”

In a Feb. 26, podcast, “Dalichov” bragged that she kept her ideology a secret from school administrators and discussed white nationalism in her classroom, the Huffington Post reported.

Volitich could not be reached for comment. However, in a statement released by her attorney, she did not deny operating the podcast, NBC News reported.

She insisted, however, that her commentary was “for the purpose of attracting listenrs and followers, and generating conversation about the content discussed between myself and my guests."

In the statement, reported by NBC News, Volitich said she never revealed her political views to her students.

"The views 'Tiana Dalichov' espouses do not pervade my professional career," she said in the statement released by her attorney. "As an adult, my decisions are my own, and my family has nothing whatsoever to do with my social media accounts or my podcast.

“From them, I humbly ask for forgiveness, as it was never my intention to cause them grief while engaging in a hobby on my personal time."

Volitich could not immediately be reached for comment.

Crystal River Middle School, located about 80 miles north of Tampa, is nearly 90 percent white, according to the National Center for Education Statistics

Volitich became certified to teach in Florida in July 2016, according to state records. She graduated from Ohio State University in 2014 with a bachelor of arts degree, NBC News reported.

After the Huffington Post report, “Tiana Dalichov” set her Twitter account to private and deleted her podcast, the Times reported, adding that the Twitter account also has been deleted.

Florida Senate to vote on school safety bill that excludes ban on assault rifles

The Florida Senate will vote on a school safety bill Monday.

Senators hammered out the legislation during a rare special session in Tallahassee over the weekend.

The push for school safety and gun control measures comes in the wake of the Parkland mass shooting, in which 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine’s Day

>> On Trump says arming teachers in schools 'up to states'

The Senate spent nearly eight hours Saturday debating dozens of amendments to the 100-page bill before finally approving the legislation for a final vote on Monday.

Democratic proposals to ban assault rifles and large-capacity magazines were rejected, as was a Democratic proposal to strip language from the bill that would create a program to arm teachers who have gone through law-enforcement training if school districts choose to take part in the so-called marshal plan.

>> On Police advocacy group says it opposes arming teachers

It was clear that senators were divided on the bill, and not just on party lines. While crafted by Republicans, some GOP senators still opposed it because they don't agree with raising the minimum age to buy a rifle from 18 to 21 or requiring a waiting period to buy the weapons.

Democrats believe the legislation doesn't go far enough in some ways and goes too far in others. And while some oppose the bill, others believe it's at least a first step toward gun safety.

>> Company working on bulletproof doors in wake of school shootings

Democrats want to ban weapons such as the AR-15 assault-style rifle, which was used in the Parkland attack. Many also oppose arming teachers. The bill also includes provisions to boost school security, establish new mental health programs in schools, and improve communication between schools, law enforcement and state agencies.

Jeff Xavier, a survivor of the Pulse attack, was hoping the legislation would include a ban on assault rifles.

>> Walmart raising age to buy guns to 21 after Florida high school shooting

“I think that, as Americans, we do have a right to arm ourselves, however, I do not believe that high-powered, high-velocity (guns) should be available to the general public,” said Xavier.

But much of the debate Saturday revolved around gun control and whether people should have a right to own an assault rifle.

"Every constitutional right that we hold dear has a limitation," said Democratic Sen. Gary Farmer. "These are just military-style killing machines and the right of self-defense and the ability to hunt will go on."

Republicans argued that banning such weapons would violate the Second Amendment right to bear arms.

>> Florida school shooting: How difficult is it to purchase a gun in Florida?

"Our founding fathers weren't talking about hunting, and they weren't talking about protecting themselves from the thief down the street who might break in," said Republican Sen. David Simmons. Simmons said people need guns to protect themselves from a tyrannical government.

"Adolf Hitler confiscated all the weapons – took all the weapons, had a registry of everybody – and then on the night of June 30th, 1934, sent out his secret police and murdered all of his political opponents," Simmons said. "You think it doesn't happen in a free society? It does."

>> Read more trending news 

The Legislature wraps up its annual session on Friday. Lawmakers are scrambling to take some kind of action before then. The full House has yet to take up its version of the bill.

Republican Gov. Rick Scott has been lobbying lawmakers to pass his plan to assign at least one law-enforcement officer for every 1,000 students at a school. Scott is opposed to arming teachers.

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