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Man facing child porn charges after 'gingerbread house' full of explicit photos found in forest

A Mill Creek, Washington, man is facing charges after a treehouse was found in the Snoqualmie National Forest with child pornography hanging on the walls inside.

>> Watch the news report here

KIRO-TV first reported on the discovery off the middle fork of the Snoqualmie River in February. The unauthorized treehouse was reported by an employee of the Department of Natural Resources, according to court documents. A DNR worker took a couple of the photographs off the wall to show law enforcement and called the King County Sheriff's Office.

The DNR employee took a detective to the treehouse, which was described in court documents as "an elaborate tree house that resembled a fairy or gingerbread house." The treehouse was about 8 feet off the ground with a porch surrounding it.

>> On Treehouse filled with child porn found near North Bend

Investigators say that inside the treehouse they found photographs of naked young girls framed on the walls. There was also a bed, food, supplies, a book and an electronic keyboard.

They found an envelope with more pornographic images.

The King County Sheriff's Office handed the case over to the FBI to investigate. The FBI sent KIRO-TV new photos of the house on Monday.

The FBI searched the cabin in April 2017 and collected items to test for fingerprints and DNA to find out who built the cabin.

They took construction photos, smoking material, bedding, glasses, photos of girls, bags of batteries and glass from the photograph frames.

They sent the items to the FBI laboratory in Quantico.

Federal investigators said they also talked to a Search and Rescue volunteer who said he had seen an SUV near the cabin on multiple occasions, and he had the license plate information. Investigators tracked down the owner of the vehicle and watched him.

>> Read more trending news 

Investigators said they took a swab from the handle of his motorcycle and later got a paper drinking cup he discarded. Those items were also sent to the lab in Quantico.

According to court documents, the items tested at Quantico positively identified the 56-year-old Mill Creek man. Court records show Daniel Wood, of Mill Creek, has been charged with two counts of child pornography possession.

FBI agents searched Woods condominium in Mill Creek in February and collected his computers, Amazon Fire, SD cards, Polaroid tablet, VHS tapes and video recorder.

Parents of bullies could face $500 fine if Pennsylvania bill becomes law

A Pennsylvania lawmaker has introduced legislation that could have parents footing the bill if their child bullies another kid at school.

>> Watch the news report here

It started out as a rule in Sharpsburg.

>> On Parents face fines in new anti-bullying ordinance

WPXI checked with the police officer who enforces the law and he said it is working as a deterrent.

He also said it's raised awareness of how serious bullying is, and the potential consequences.

After Brentwood and Sharpsburg passed local anti-bullying ordinances that fine parents of bullies, a state lawmaker is proposing more encompassing legislation.

State Rep. Frank Burns' bill gives parents three strikes. He's from Cambria County.

>> Read more trending news 

The first time a child bullies someone, the school is required to inform his or her parents how it handled the situation. If it happens a second time, parents would have to take a class on bullying and attend a bullying resolution conference.

The third time, parents would receive a court citation and pay up to a $500 fine.

In a statement issued last week, the Democrat said bullying can lead to physical assaults and suicide.

He said holding students, parents and officials accountable "is the only way to put an end to this scourge."

The proposal also includes an anonymous bullying reporting system requiring the state education department to track bullying incidents and file monthly reports.

Sharpsburg police have yet to file any citations against parents.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Pit bull bites children inside North Carolina elementary school

Police have found a dog that they said got into a south Charlotte, North Carolina, elementary school Monday afternoon and injured several children.

>> Watch the news report here

It happened around 1:30 p.m. at Lansdowne Elementary School on Prett Court, near Providence Road.

Animal Care and Control officials said a pit bull came into the playground area while children were outside. The children were rushed into the school by staff, but the dog managed to get inside the school.

Some of the children were frightened and tried to run, but officers said the dog reacted by jumping on and biting some of the children. Incident reports indicate that the dog bit the children in the leg, the thigh and the stomach.

>> Read more trending news 

A teacher was eventually able to confine the pit bull and contacted the animal’s owner from the information on the dog's collar. The owner, who was visiting from Fayetteville, picked up the dog named "Bro" and left before Animal Care and Control officers arrived at the school.

Seven children suffered minor injuries, authorities said, but paramedics were not needed.

Animal Care and Control officials said they have located the owner of the dog and confirmed that its rabies vaccination is current.

Charlotte's leash law says animals not on a leash must be contained within a fence or an operable and marked invisible fence. 

>> Click here to read the law

How did crucifixion kill Jesus?

On Friday, Christians around the world commemorate with prayers and fasting the death of Jesus Christ, three days before the arrival of Easter and the hope of the Resurrection.

The church calls on believers to solemnly reflect on the pain and suffering of Jesus of Nazareth, particularly beginning at 3 p.m. when it is believed Jesus died as he hung on a cross outside the city of Jerusalem.

While the Bible gives agonizing details of the crucifixion of Jesus, what do we know about what happens to a body undergoing this sadistic method of execution?

How does crucifixion kill you?

First, the history

Crucifixion is a gruesome mode of execution, and that’s why the Romans in Jesus’ day used it. A method of control and intimidation, Roman authorities used crucifixion to rid their cities of slaves, heinous criminals and, most important to the empire, insurgents.

Crucifixion was likely first used in what is modern day Iran. The vicious method of eliminating one’s enemies spread throughout the ancient world to Greece where Alexander the Great was known to have used it.

From there, the Romans adopted the practice and elevated it to a level that was unprecedented – at one point crucifying 500 people a day. It was practiced from the 6th century BC until the 4th century AD. The Roman emperor Constantine I banned the practice in 337 AD.

Why use crucifixion?

The Romans did not lack for ways to kill their enemies, but crucifixion allowed for two things – humiliation and a slow, painful death. The punishment was a method of intimidation that the Romans raised to an art form.

One Roman historian wrote of an event that saw 2,000 crucified on one day for the amusement of an emperor.

The process

Crucifixion followed a bloody script of sorts that maximized the suffering and prolonged death. It began when the one being crucified was stripped of his clothing then beaten with a flagrum, a short-handled whip made with lengths of leather that had bone and iron balls woven into the strips.

The person was beaten savagely with the whip which tore flesh then muscle, weakening the victim through blood loss and shock. While the aim was to inflict maximum injury, that part of the process was not intended to kill. 

After the beating -- where ribs were often broken from the repeated blows -- the victim would be forced to pick up and carry the beam of the cross he was to be hanged on.

Crucifixions were held outside of the city, and while the upright part of the cross, called the stripe, was permanently placed in the area the crucifixions took place, the crossbar, called the patibulum, had to be transported there. The patibulum usually weighed between 75 and 100 pounds.

We often see images of Jesus Christ nailed to a cross that is high above the ground, but this likely isn’t a true representation of Roman crucifixions.

The first crucifixions had the victims suspended just above the ground so their feet would not touch holy ground. By the time the Romans were crucifying people, the crosses were probably from 7 to 9 feet tall

Not all crosses were the familiar “t” shape we see depicted in art. Some resembled the letters “X” and “Y,” while some looked like an uppercase “T.” Some people, like the Apostle Peter, were crucified upside down on an inverted cross.

Some researchers say Jesus may have been crucified on a stake instead of a cross, which was another method of crucifixion.

While we read in the Bible of Jesus’ hands and feet being nailed the cross, that wasn’t always the case, either. When the hands were attached to the cross, it was usually done with spikes being driven into the wrists, not the hands, to better support the weight of the victim. Most victims, according to the writing of historians of the day, had their hands tied to the cross with rope, their feet nailed into the sides near the bottom of the cross.

The victims knees would be bent at around 45 degrees before their feet were nailed to the cross. The position eventually makes it impossible to hold one’s self upright, and the person would begin sag on the cross. The body’s weight would eventually pull the shoulders out of socket, thrusting the chest forward where it would become impossible to take in a breath.

It is written in the Bible that at one point Jesus was offered a drink of wine and a mild pain killer called gall or myrhh, and he declined it. The practice of offering those being crucified the drink is documented in other historical accounts. It was a service provided by a group of women from Jerusalem. 

How do you die?

If you survived the shock and blood loss from the beating, then were able to carry the patibulum to the place where you were to be crucified, then lived through your feet and your hands having spikes driven into them, your final misery was just beginning.

There are many theories as to what kills you as you hang on a cross. From blood loss from the beating, to shock and dehydration, it could be any combination of the factors, scientists believe.

The Royal Society of Medicine in 2006 published an article that centered on Jesus’ crucifixion, chronicling nine possible causes of death. And while suffocation from the weight of one’s body dangling from a cross has long been believed to be the cause of death in crucifixion, others think the process is a more complicated chain reaction of events.

The researchers from the RSM study believed death came to those crucified by one or more of the body’s failing processes.

The study suggested that as the person suspended on a cross struggles to breath, that lack of oxygen would trigger damage to tissue and veins causing blood to leak into the lungs and the heart. The lungs would stiffen and the heart become constricted from the pressure, making it difficult, then impossible to pump blood throughout the body. The lack of oxygenated blood would eventually cause each body system to fail and death would follow.

It could take hours, or, in some cases, days, but it was only a matter of time before death would come. 

In the biblical accounts of Jesus’ death, the process took six hours, and, in the end, he cried out to God.

Matthew 27:50-51 "And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice, and yielded up the ghost. And behold, the veil of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom; and the earth shook and the rocks were split.…"

Sources: GizmodoBelieve.comNIM; The Guardian

Easter 2018: When is it; what is it; why isn't it on the same date every year?

“Hey, do you have any idea when Christmas is?” is not a question you usually hear in late November or early December.

Major holidays are stamped on our calendars, often with little symbols, in case you don't know, for instance, that a turkey means Thanksgiving. 

Easter, however, is different. The date of Easter, when Christians celebrate the risen Christ, is different every year. 

Many factors have contributed to keeping the date a guessing game, but the rolling calendar on Easter is due mainly to astronomy and a group of men who got together in the ancient city of Nicaea to come up with a system of deciding when to celebrate the holiest day in the Christian calendar.

Here is a look at the origins of the remembrance, the reason for the floating date and when Easter will be celebrated this year.

What is Easter?On Easter, Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Jesus of Nazareth was a carpenter who became an itinerant preacher at the age of 30. For the next three years, he drew thousands of followers in the relatively small area where he preached. 

When Jewish leaders and Roman officials began to feel threatened by his growing popularity, he was arrested as he came into Jerusalem for the Jewish festival of Passover. He stood trial, was found guilty by a crowd and was mocked, beaten and eventually crucified. Followers believe that Jesus rose from the dead on the third day after his crucifixion.

The Old Testament prophecy of a messiah being persecuted, then executed, then resurrected – all for the sins of his followers -- is believed by many to have been fulfilled with Jesus’ death.

Where in the Bible is the story of Jesus’ execution?The story of Jesus’ death appears in all four of the Gospels of the New Testament. You’ll find them in Matthew 28, Mark 16, Luke 24 and John 18.

When is Easter this year?Easter is on April 1 in 2018.

Why is it on different dates every year?

The answer is not a simple one. In 325 CE,  the Council of Nicaea, a gathering of Christian bishops, decided that there should be a more organized and universal way to decide when Easter would be celebrated. The council decided that the remembrance would be held the first Sunday after the first full moon occurring on or after the vernal equinox.

The date for the vernal equinox was based on the ecclesiastical approximation of March 21. If the full moon falls on a Sunday, Easter is delayed a week.

How early and how late can Easter be celebrated?Easter can come as early as March 22, and as late as April 25 in the Gregorian calendar.

What does the word Easter mean?It could be from the name of the fertility goddess Eostre. It could be from the Norse "eostur" or "eastur," meaning “the season of the growing sun,” or some combination of those terms and others from pagan festivals and ceremonies.

When was Easter first celebrated?It’s not known when the first remembrance of Jesus’ death took place, but there are records of ceremonies beginning in the 2nd century. The celebrations were held around the Jewish Passover each year, a date that was dependent on the vernal equinox.

What are Good Friday and Maundy Thursday?Good Friday commemorates the day on which Jesus was crucified. Maundy Thursday commemorates the Last Supper, the final meal that Jesus had with his disciples.

How did a bunny become a symbol?No one is really sure about how the Easter Bunny came into being, but, he/she likely is a combination of several ancient harvest festival symbols. says the bunny could have come from the pagan festival of Eostre. Eostre is a goddess of fertility and, because of the rabbit’s reputation for, shall we say, productivity, the animal became the symbol for Eostre.

Historians believe it is likely that the festival with its bunny symbol made its way through Europe and gave birth to the Osterhase, or Oschter Haws – an egg-laying rabbit popular in German fiction. German immigrants brought with them to America the tradition of laying colored eggs as gifts in nests built by children during a spring festival. 

Eventually, the bunny started to bring candy and other gifts with the eggs on Easter morning as a sign of the celebration of new life.

Why is it called Good Friday and what’s so good about it?

Christians believe Jesus was mocked publicly and crucified on a solemn Friday more than two thousand years ago. Today, the calamitous day is celebrated as Good Friday.

But what’s so good about that?

>> Read more trending news

One answer is that at the time of Jesus’ crucifixion, “good” may have referred to “holy” in Old English, a linguistic theory supported by many language experts.

According to Slate, the Oxford English Dictionary notes the Wednesday before Easter was once called “Good Wednesday.” Today, it’s more commonly known as Holy Wednesday.

And Anatoly Liberman, a University of Minnesota professor who studies the origins of English words, told Slate if we consider the alternative names for Good Friday, such as “Sacred Friday” (romance languages) or “Passion Friday” (Russian), this theory makes a lot of sense.

Another possible reason for its moniker — a theory supported by both linguists and historical evidence — refers to the holiday’s ties to Easter Sunday, which celebrates the resurrection of Christ.

Because Jesus couldn’t have been resurrected without dying, the day of his death is, in a sense, “good.”

“That terrible Friday has been called Good Friday because it led to the Resurrection of Jesus and his victory over death and sin and the celebration of Easter, the very pinnacle of Christian celebrations,” the Huffington Post reported.

A third answer, some believe, is that the “good” in Good Friday was derived from "God” or “God’s Friday” — the way the term “goodbye” comes from a contraction of the phrase “God Be With You.”

Still, not everyone refers to this day as Good Friday. For example, 

The Catholic Encyclopedia mentions that, in the Greek Church, the holiday is known as "the Holy and Great Friday." In German, it's referred to as "Sorrowful Friday."

And as aforementioned, “Sacred Friday” and “Passion Friday” are also used.

In addition, because the holiday is also commemorated with a long fast, Good Friday was also referred to as “Long Friday” by the Anglo-Saxons.


Police offer tips for spotting suspicious mail with Austin serial bomber on the loose

Tulsa police are helping area residents stay aware of suspicious packages after multiple package explosions in Austin, Texas.

>> Read more trending news 

The police department posted the tips on Twitter Tuesday.

Local residents said that even though the explosions happened in Texas, they are nervous and extra cautious when checking the mail.

Police said residents should make sure that they know who is sending the package and to avoid opening packages without a return address.

They also said that unexpected mail from a foreign country with excessive tape, restrictive markings, misspelled words, suspicious substances, strange odors, protruding wires or rigid or bulky contents could also be suspicious.

>> Related: Austin package explosions: Sixth blast not related to serial bombings, police say

Those who receive mail that they believe could pose a threat should isolate the area immediately, call 911 and wash their hands with soap and water.

Dog viciously killed by owner in driveway, horrified neighbors now seeking justice for Gabriel 

Residents in North Tulsa, Oklahoma, want justice for a dog they believe was killed by his owner. 

>> Read more trending news 

James Penix said he looked out his window on Feb. 21 after hearing the screams of a dog. Penix said he saw his neighbor killing his dog named Gabriel with a dumbbell in the driveway. 

Penix said he called 9-1-1 and emergency operators referred him to the City of Tulsa's animal control division. But he said responding animal welfare officials allegedly said they could not find the home involved in the dog’s death and left. 

>> Related: United suspends pet cargo service in wake of mix-ups, dog death

Penix began a petition on, calling for justice for Gabriel. It had more than 2,500 signatures as of Tuesday afternoon.

Animal Control reopened the investigation and will present possible charges to the Tulsa County District Attorney's Office. 

An update to the petition suggests the neighbor's other dog was taken as evidence and remains in the custody of Animal Welfare. 

>> Related: Girl injured by emotional support dog while boarding Southwest flight

The City of Tulsa responds to animal cruelty reports Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and forwards such calls to Tulsa Police after hours. 

Burglars say shop owner tortured them, made them strip naked after break-in 

burglary call at an Orange County, Florida, business ended with the arrests of not only the suspects who allegedly broke in, but the owner of the bicycle shop and two others, as well.

>> Read more trending news 

The culprits have accused the shop owner of torturing  them for hours before calling 911.

The pair said owner Robert Antley made them strip down to their underwear, beat them and held them at gunpoint for more than two hours.

According to the arrest affidavit, Jose Gonzalez, 27, and Michael Eller, 28, admitted to deputies that they broke into the Gas Bikes Shop early Sunday morning.

>> Related: Woman robbed of $10,000 jackpot in casino parking lot 

Once inside, they were confronted by Antley, who was allegedly waiting for them with a gun. 

According to the report, Antley told deputies that he had been sleeping inside the store due to several prior burglaries. Instead of calling 911 to report the break-in, Eller and Gonzalez told deputies Antley made the two men strip down to their underwear and face a wall. The report said the burglars told deputies Antley jabbed the gun into both men's sides and threatened to kill them.

Eller told deputies that at least an hour passed before Antley's brother, Joshua, 24, and his girlfriend, Kathryn Pellicio, showed up.

>> Related: Florida teen charged with murder after allegedly beating boy with baseball bat, deputies say 

Eller and Gonzalez said they were then led to a bathroom in the back of the store where they were beaten for more than an hour.

Antley claimed his cellphone battery was dead and claimed the men had cut his phone wires at the shop, the report said.

Antley told deputies he called 911 when his brother arrived, but deputies said they were not able to corroborate his statements.

WFTV legal analyst Bill Sheaffer said property owners have a right to protect themselves.

“You are allowed to engage in conduct that is reasonable, necessary and lawful to protect yourself or your property, but one may argue that these efforts were neither reasonable nor lawful," Sheaffer said.

Antley bonded out of jail Monday afternoon. His brother and his girlfriend remain jailed.

>> Related: South Florida man accused of trying to lure child into car, deputies say

Eller and Gonzalez remain in the Orange County Jail

Bride temporarily blinded by poisonous bouquet gets wedding re-do

Bride Christine Jo Miller was getting ready for her Sept. 2, 2017, wedding when she noticed a rash on her skin.

Days before, she picked green and white wildflowers to add to her bouquet that turned out to be Euphorbia marginata, or snow-on-the-mountain, a poisonous flower.

>> Read more trending news 

“It all went downhill from there,” Miller, 23, told Women’s Health. “I had walked out of the bathroom and my sister said my face was red and bumpy,” she said. “It started going down my neck and arms.”

Miller said her rash continued to get worse and she lost her eyesight. She went to the hospital right after and got a shot and eye drops. Miller said hospital staff told her how fortunate she was to not have permanent eye damage.

Miller and her husband, Jon, stopped by Target on the way to their reception to get more comfortable clothes.

“He got me pajamas that said ‘Bride’ on it,” Miller told People. “He asked if he should change too and I said no. He made me as comfortable as possible.”

The newlyweds cut cake, had their first dance and by the end of the night, Miller fell asleep in their hotel room and her husband ordered pizza.

People reported that TV host Steve Harvey heard about their story and brought them on his talk show to surprise them with a a week-long Disney Dream Wedding re-do.

“I had just never heard of a wedding where the bride had to be rushed to the emergency room for having an allergic reaction to her bouquet and having so many bad things happen on their wedding day,” Harvey told People. “I really felt like they deserved another opportunity to celebrate and what better place to make it happen than Disney.”

Christine Jo Miller got a new wedding gown and was able to say “I do” with clear vision. She and Jon Miller will honeymoon at Disney’s Aulani Resort in Hawaii, and on top of the dream wedding, they are expecting a baby in September.

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